Favourite Ever British Animated Character
Peppa Pig
Peppa gets my vote! As well as being the cutest pig ever, the kids love Peppa, which makes me love Peppa :)
Drew Giles

Peppa Pig

Peppa gets my vote! As well as being the cutest pig ever, the kids love Peppa, which makes me love Peppa :)

Drew Giles

Roobarb
Roobarb and Custard being Bob Godfrey,s greatest creation and who’s do it yourself attitude to animation is what inspired a generation of animators (including myself) to get started.
James Farrington, Mill TV and Film
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I would like to Vote for Roobarb and Custard for the British animation awards. Having grown up when our golden retriever dog was often likened to Roobarb, I have such a warm and h appy memory when I hear the soundtrack.
Lucy
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Roobarb out of Roobarb and Custard, because he always seemed so carefree and at ease with himself and life. And he reminded me of my first dog when I was young.
Rob Doherty, Aardman Animations & festivus
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Roobarb, because he’s anarchic and innocent and a perfect example of design, voice, script and character all working in unison.  And he provided me with the quote “My crummy plan is working!
Mole Hill
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Roobarb is my favourite because he is so eccentric and enthusiastic.  My favourite episode is the one where he ties a spike onto his nose  to fool the birds that he is one, and then he suffers the indignity  of landing spike-first in the ground. The theme tune is a classic,  and the structure of the narrative is great, sly cat, optimistic dog  and a bird chorus who switch their support from one to the other.
Suzie Hanna, Animation Filmmaker & Teacher
___________
He is so positive, when allthe world is against him he still plows on and no matter how badly his actions turn out, he will always come back for more undaunted.  I drew him on the back of my satchel when I was at school. He was one of the characters that inspired me  to want to be an animator.  Shaun McGlinchey
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Roobarb and Custard Too
My favourite character(s) from childhood can’t be separated I’m afraid, its- Roobarb and Custard.  I loved the drawing style and the fact that it moved quickly (now I know more how it was done of course) but overall i loved their stupid personalities and thought Custard was brilliant and begged my parents for a cat like that.
Helen Brunsden, Animation Consultant / Producer
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Roobarb from Roobarb and Custard is my favourite! He is full of enthusiasm and energy and remind me a little of myself!
Kirsten Greaves, Social Media Executive, PDSA
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Mine has definitely got to be Roobarb & Custard… in fact, I loved the brand so much as a kid that we sought out the owners and now represent the licensing rights to it! Of all the brands I’ve ever worked on, Roobarb and Custard is one that’s guaranteed to bring a smile to the faces of our clients and they inevitably end up singing the theme tune and reminiscing about their childhood. The brand has stood the test of time, still pulling in big ratings for Milkshake with a strong presence in the licensing world too and has recently been signed by the PDSA vet charity to support their work throughout the UK. 
Rob Corney
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My vote would be for Roobarb.  Loved the show – loved the simplicity of the animation and the humour.  It was Bob Godfrey’s “Do It Yourself Animation Show” that got me into the business. So Roobarb every time for me!  (With lashings of Custard!)
Tony Collingwood - Writer/Director, COLLINGWOOD O’HARE PRODUCTIONS LTD

Roobarb

Roobarb and Custard being Bob Godfrey,s greatest creation and who’s do it yourself attitude to animation is what inspired a generation of animators (including myself) to get started.

James Farrington, Mill TV and Film

__________________

I would like to Vote for Roobarb and Custard for the British animation awards. Having grown up when our golden retriever dog was often likened to Roobarb, I have such a warm and h appy memory when I hear the soundtrack.
Lucy

____________

Roobarb out of Roobarb and Custard, because he always seemed so carefree and at ease with himself and life. And he reminded me of my first dog when I was young.

Rob Doherty, Aardman Animations & festivus

____________

Roobarb, because he’s anarchic and innocent and a perfect example of design, voice, script and character all working in unison.  And he provided me with the quote “My crummy plan is working!

Mole Hill

____________

Roobarb is my favourite because he is so eccentric and enthusiastic. 
My favourite episode is the one where he ties a spike onto his nose 
to fool the birds that he is one, and then he suffers the indignity 
of landing spike-first in the ground. The theme tune is a classic, 
and the structure of the narrative is great, sly cat, optimistic dog 
and a bird chorus who switch their support from one to the other.

Suzie Hanna, Animation Filmmaker & Teacher

___________

He is so positive, when allthe world is against him he still plows on and no matter how badly his actions turn out, he will always come back for more undaunted.
I drew him on the back of my satchel when I was at school. He was one of the characters that inspired me  to want to be an animator.

Shaun McGlinchey

____________

Roobarb and Custard Too

My favourite character(s) from childhood can’t be separated I’m afraid, its- Roobarb and Custard.  I loved the drawing style and the fact that it moved quickly (now I know more how it was done of course) but overall i loved their stupid personalities and thought Custard was brilliant and begged my parents for a cat like that.

Helen Brunsden, Animation Consultant / Producer

_________________

Roobarb from Roobarb and Custard is my favourite! He is full of enthusiasm and energy and remind me a little of myself!

Kirsten Greaves, Social Media Executive, PDSA

_________________

Mine has definitely got to be Roobarb & Custard… in fact, I loved the brand so much as a kid that we sought out the owners and now represent the licensing rights to it! Of all the brands I’ve ever worked on, Roobarb and Custard is one that’s guaranteed to bring a smile to the faces of our clients and they inevitably end up singing the theme tune and reminiscing about their childhood. The brand has stood the test of time, still pulling in big ratings for Milkshake with a strong presence in the licensing world too and has recently been signed by the PDSA vet charity to support their work throughout the UK.

Rob Corney

_______________

My vote would be for Roobarb.  Loved the show – loved the simplicity of the animation and the humour.  It was Bob Godfrey’s “Do It Yourself Animation Show” that got me into the business. So Roobarb every time for me!  (With lashings of Custard!)

Tony Collingwood - Writer/Director, COLLINGWOOD O’HARE PRODUCTIONS LTD

Simon’s Cat
I am addicted to the Simon’s Cat films. Cat Man Do, had me in stitches!! Reminds me of my own cats. Poor Simon.
Maria Alexiou
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I think that    Simon’s Cat should be nominated at it gives my whole family, from grandchildren  to grandparents a great laugh. Simon Tofield, the man with the pen, is a  genius.
Simon Gibson
____________ My nomination for the UK’s Favourite Ever British Animated Character of all time, has to be     Simon’s Cat!!!         Was a tough decision, as there has been so many fantastic characters  created over the years; but Simon’s Cat is brilliant at highlighting the  great relationship that we have with animals & the interaction that  ensues. Simon Tolfield manages to capture the very essence of being  involved in an animals life & all the ups & downs that come with  it.     He never ceases to amaze me how well he can capture all of the  emotions, reactions & behaviour of the animals (& humans!!) so  perfectly in cartoon form! He’s been a revelation!    Well done to Simon & all his cats! He would be a deserving winner!        
LeiannWebster

Simon’s Cat

I am addicted to the Simon’s Cat films. Cat Man Do, had me in stitches!! Reminds me of my own cats. Poor Simon.

Maria Alexiou

______________

I think that Simon’s Cat should be nominated at it gives my whole family, from grandchildren to grandparents a great laugh. Simon Tofield, the man with the pen, is a genius.

Simon Gibson

____________
My nomination for the UK’s Favourite Ever British Animated Character of all time, has to be Simon’s Cat!!!
 
Was a tough decision, as there has been so many fantastic characters created over the years; but Simon’s Cat is brilliant at highlighting the great relationship that we have with animals & the interaction that ensues. Simon Tolfield manages to capture the very essence of being involved in an animals life & all the ups & downs that come with it.
He never ceases to amaze me how well he can capture all of the emotions, reactions & behaviour of the animals (& humans!!) so perfectly in cartoon form! He’s been a revelation!
Well done to Simon & all his cats! He would be a deserving winner!   http://tracking.technodesignip.com/?action=count&projectid=642&contentid=6581&referrer=-&urlaction=r...  

LeiannWebster

Timmy - Timmy Time
Currently internationally understood little lamb making out at pre-school. No words, just  'baahs' and the normal Aardman perfection. Baah!
Wayne Jackman

Timmy - Timmy Time

Currently internationally understood little lamb making out at pre-school. No words, just 
'baahs' and the normal Aardman perfection. Baah!

Wayne Jackman

Having spent 40 years animating characters, and having animated  thousands of different ones, it’s hard to choose a favourite. But the  one that I have certainly enjoyed working with as much as any is The  Famous Grouse. He started life as an illustration on the whisky bottle  label (drawn I think by the distiller Matthew Gloag’s daughter a century  ago) but I first directed him for the TV ad campaign about 15 years  ago. The challenge is to give him character, but in only 16 seconds,  with no facial expression, and no voice. It’s fun. 
Hibbert Ralph Animation 

Having spent 40 years animating characters, and having animated thousands of different ones, it’s hard to choose a favourite. But the one that I have certainly enjoyed working with as much as any is The Famous Grouse. He started life as an illustration on the whisky bottle label (drawn I think by the distiller Matthew Gloag’s daughter a century ago) but I first directed him for the TV ad campaign about 15 years ago. The challenge is to give him character, but in only 16 seconds, with no facial expression, and no voice. It’s fun. 

Hibbert Ralph Animation 

Jaguar
So many great characters, but my favourite of all time?  Has to be the  Jaguar in Nick Park’s original Creature Comforts short film.  Lounging  on its branch in the zoo, discoursing to camera about the benefits of  living in Brazil with it’s ‘space’ and plentiful supply of ‘fresh  meat’.  Sublime in every way.
Michael Rose, Producer.    Magic Light Picture
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The best animated character ever is the jaguar in  Nick Park’s Oscar winning short ‘Creature Comforts’. It’s why I came to  work here.  
 Alix Wiseman, Aardman Animations

Jaguar

So many great characters, but my favourite of all time?  Has to be the Jaguar in Nick Park’s original Creature Comforts short film.  Lounging on its branch in the zoo, discoursing to camera about the benefits of living in Brazil with it’s ‘space’ and plentiful supply of ‘fresh meat’.  Sublime in every way.

Michael Rose, Producer. Magic Light Picture

________________

The best animated character ever is the jaguar in Nick Park’s Oscar winning short ‘Creature Comforts’. It’s why I came to work here.  

Alix Wiseman, Aardman Animations

I’m  finding it hard to choose between Tog, Pippin or the Witch form Pogles  Wood. I guess it was Tog the squirrel when I was a child and now I love  the witch! What I loved most about Pogles wood was the Woods themselves.  The outdoor shots resonated with  my environment on a farm and the  Witch was fabulously scary. Being brought up a Catholic made me  particularly drawn to the dark side where I could really frighten  myself. Diana Dors as a Devil particularly freaked me out..but now you  have sent me strolling down the 1960s/70s TV path. -Joan Ashworth, filmmaker and Head of Animation, RCA

I’m finding it hard to choose between Tog, Pippin or the Witch form Pogles Wood. I guess it was Tog the squirrel when I was a child and now I love the witch! What I loved most about Pogles wood was the Woods themselves. The outdoor shots resonated with  my environment on a farm and the Witch was fabulously scary. Being brought up a Catholic made me particularly drawn to the dark side where I could really frighten myself. Diana Dors as a Devil particularly freaked me out..but now you have sent me strolling down the 1960s/70s TV path. -Joan Ashworth, filmmaker and Head of Animation, RCA

Boni
Well, since all my main faves have already been mentioned, and with my list ever-so long, I’ve decided to settle with   Boni , the poor old skull from ”   The Trap Door” - although   Berk comes a close second!
Who would have thought you could get such great humour from a skull  head? A terrific character to play off from, constantly moaning about  everything (including a headache), but it’s also thanks to Willie  Rushton’s incredible voice acting that’s made “Moany Boni” so endearing  and classic. -Chris Signore, Illustrator + Animator

Boni

Well, since all my main faves have already been mentioned, and with my list ever-so long, I’ve decided to settle with Boni , the poor old skull from ” The Trap Door” - although Berk comes a close second!

Who would have thought you could get such great humour from a skull head? A terrific character to play off from, constantly moaning about everything (including a headache), but it’s also thanks to Willie Rushton’s incredible voice acting that’s made “Moany Boni” so endearing and classic. -Chris Signore, Illustrator + Animator

Wallace and Gromit
 My favourite would have to be Wallace and Gromit. They are great characters in the British tradition. Fantastically animated, great characterization, wonderfully designed. An absolute joy to watch.
Jason Kotey, Animator
_______________
They best depict the kind of British qualities that is rather unique to an outsider of British popular culture. The chemistry between a man and his dog, Wallace being forever optimistic attitude towards his own inventions, and Gromit being forever loyal to Wallace, despite going against the grain most of the time.
Nick Park’s short films, featuring the duo, were one of the main reasons why I wanted to become an animated filmmaker. I still find influence in Aardman’s excellent legacy of films, television, and adverts to this day, with A Grand Day Out, The Wrong Trousers, and A Close Shave being the tip of an extraordinary iceberg, that carry the same cultural gravitas that some of the best in British culture has to offer. 
 
Andy Norton, Freelance Artist

Wallace and Gromit

My favourite would have to be Wallace and Gromit. They are great characters in the British tradition. Fantastically animated, great characterization, wonderfully designed. An absolute joy to watch.

Jason Kotey, Animator

_______________

They best depict the kind of British qualities that is rather unique to an outsider of British popular culture. The chemistry between a man and his dog, Wallace being forever optimistic attitude towards his own inventions, and Gromit being forever loyal to Wallace, despite going against the grain most of the time.
Nick Park’s short films, featuring the duo, were one of the main reasons why I wanted to become an animated filmmaker. I still find influence in Aardman’s excellent legacy of films, television, and adverts to this day, with A Grand Day Out, The Wrong Trousers, and A Close Shave being the tip of an extraordinary iceberg, that carry the same cultural gravitas that some of the best in British culture has to offer. 
 
Andy Norton, Freelance Artist
The Cresta Bear
But I didn’t grow up in the UK so the first I saw of British animation  was when Richard Williams visited my art college with his show reel in  the late 70’s. And the Cresta ads really appealed to me. I hadn’t  really considered becoming an animator before that (and didn’t for  another 10 years).http://wn.com/Cresta_Bear_Advert  -Sharon Smith, Animator/Story Artist

The Cresta Bear

But I didn’t grow up in the UK so the first I saw of British animation 
was when Richard Williams visited my art college with his show reel in 
the late 70’s. And the Cresta ads really appealed to me. I hadn’t 
really considered becoming an animator before that (and didn’t for 
another 10 years).
http://wn.com/Cresta_Bear_Advert  -Sharon Smith, Animator/Story Artist